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Saturday / July 20. 2024
HomePosts Tagged "GI tag"

Kishtwar saffron comes from the scenic Kishtwar region, nestled in the mountainous landscapes of Jammu, and is referred to locally as ‘Kung’ and nationally as ‘Kesar.’

Kashmir’s Kishtwar saffron has recently been awarded a GI tag for its exceptional quality. Saffron is considered one of the most expensive spices in the world, with hand-collected strands from crocus flowers costing lakhs per kilogram. Kashmir produces some of the most expensive and highest-quality saffron, and Kishtwar Saffron, from the Kishtwar Region of Jammu and Kashmir, has recently been awarded the prestigious Geographical Indication (GI) tag by the Geographical Indications Registry according to the local news.

A GI tag is an indication of quality that acts as a mark of intellectual property and confirms that the product originates from a specific geographical region and has unique and valuable characteristics due to its place of origin. Kishtwar saffron comes from the scenic Kishtwar region, nestled in the mountainous landscapes of Jammu, and is referred to locally as ‘Kung’ and nationally as ‘Kesar.’ This spice holds pivotal economic importance in this secluded district, with Mandal, the saffron production area, encompassing around 120 hectares of cultivable land, establishing Kishtwar as a significant hub for saffron cultivation.

Kishtwar saffron has not only won the GI tag but also a Grade 1 quality rating. To achieve this rating, 1150 grams of saffron flowers harvested from Berwar underwent a thorough physical and chemical analysis at the India International Kashmir Saffron Trading Centre (IIKSTC) in Dussu Pampore. As a result of this process, 110 grams of fresh saffron filaments and 20 grams of top-tier dry Lacha saffron were extracted and subsequently designated as Grade 1.

Kishtwar saffron comes from the scenic Kishtwar

Bediya chilli mandi in Khargone district is the second-largest chilli market in India

The Madhya Pradesh horticulture and food processing department has applied for geographical indication (GI) tags for 46 state speciality products to aid in their worldwide promotion.

As part of the government’s ‘One District, One Product’ initiative, Nimar’s distinctive crop, Khargone Red Chillies, is already making a splash in foreign markets with 46 other products.

According to the local media Khargone district’s red chillies will receive special product status during Vikas Parv.

The Khargone’s chillies are among 46 special horticulture products in the state. A mission is underway to achieve this. The district cultivated chillies on 46556 hectares in 2023.

Bediya chilli mandi in Khargone district is the second-largest chilli market in India. The market has gained recognition for its high-quality chilli crops, leading to an increase in business expectations.

The Department of Horticulture and food processing conducted a survey of horticulture products in various districts of the state on Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan’s instructions.

Bediya chilli mandi in Khargone district is

The GI-tagged products in Nagaland include: Naga Mircha (King Chilli); Naga Tree Tomato; Naga Sweet Cucumber and Chakhesang Shawl

North Eastern Regional Agricultural Marketing Corporation (NERAMAC), under the Ministry of Development of Northeast Region (DoNER), has authorised 250 Naga Sweet Cucumber and Tree Tomato farmers in Nagaland to use NERAMAC processed Geographical Identification (GI) certification.

GI awareness programme was held in Kohima. GI initiative is part of the Government of India’s broader efforts to promote sustainable agriculture, protect the rights of farmers and enhanced the country’s agricultural exports.

A short presentation was made about the work being undertaken by NERAMAC in the North Eastern Region in general and Nagaland in particular. About 100 Naga Tree Tomato and Naga Sweet Cucumber farmers attended the seminar.

Tiakala Ao, general manager of NABARD Kohima said GI is a form of intellectual property rights that identifies a product originating from a specific geographical location, possessing qualities, reputation or characteristics that are attributable to that location. Therefore, she said GI protection can play a significant role in promoting and safeguarding the traditional and unique products of a region.

Tiakala informed that at present the GI-tagged products in Nagaland include: Naga Mircha (King Chilli); Naga Tree Tomato; Naga Sweet Cucumber and Chakhesang Shawl.
Horticulture department director, Meyasashi, give a presentation on Naga Tree Tomato and Naga Cucumber, explaining the advantages of these products.

The GI-tagged products in Nagaland include: Naga

NABARD is providing all the support for pre-registration and post-registration to get GI tags for local products

Mushkbudji Rice, Sulai Honey, Bhaderwah Rajma and six other products from Jammu Kashmir and Ladakh will get GI Geographical Indications (GI) soon. National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) Jammu has sanctioned a project for Geographical Indications registration of nine products from the region.

The products which have gained GI tag include Mushkbudji Rice, Sulai Honey, Basohli Paintings, Basholi Pashmina Woolen Products, Chikri Wood Craft, Bhaderwah Rajma, Anardana, Ladakh Wood Carving.

NABARD is providing all the support for pre-registration and post-registration to get GI tags for local products. The GI applications of all these products have been filed at the GI registry, Chennai. The process of registration is in the final stage of granting a GI Tag. The final GI Tag is thus expected soon.

GI tag is a kind of Intellectual Property right that identifies a product originating from a specific geographical location and having distinct nature, quality, and characteristics linked to that location.

NABARD is providing all the support for

16 beneficiaries awarded an ‘Authorised User Certificate’ of GI-tagged Gulbarga Tur Dal 

At a recent training programme hosted by the University of Agricultural Sciences (UAS), Raichur and ICRISAT, 16 beneficiaries were awarded an ‘Authorised User Certificate’ of GI-tagged Gulbarga Tur Dal as granted by the Geographical Indications Registry, Government of India.

The programme enlightened the authorised users on ways to discover and flag counterfeit tur dal being sold as GI-tagged Gulbarga Tur Dal in the market. The importance of using the GI logo as an identification mark on the packaging for originality and quality assurance was explained to the authorised users.

“The GI protection offers benefits to both consumers and producers, leading to the overall economic prosperity of rural communities. An exclusive logo distinguishes the original from the counterfeit products, thus guaranteeing quality to the consumer,” said Dr Surya Mani Tripathi, Head, Legal Services, ICRISAT, who was instrumental in facilitating the GI tag for the Gulbarga Tur Dal.

The program was attended by farmers and millers, members from the Pulse Board, UAS Raichur and the IPFC team at Agribusiness and Innovation Platform (AIP)-ICRISAT. Throughout the discussion, it was emphasised that post GI registration, the focus should be on quality control and implementation of business frameworks to maximise the commercial value of GI-tagged Gulbarga Tur Dal.

16 beneficiaries awarded an 'Authorised User Certificate'

Kumar said applications for the same will soon be filed by the producers with the GI Registry for these products

The National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) has initiated the process to facilitate manufacturers/producers’ association seeking Geographical Indication (GI) tag for Bhojpur’s Udwantnagar ‘Khurma’, Gaya’s ‘Tilkut’ and delicious ‘Balu Shahi’ of Sitamarhi district, an official said.

“We are assisting the producers’/manufacturers’ associations seeking GI tag for ‘Khurma’, ‘Tilkut’ and ‘Balu Shahi’, Chief General Manager, Nabard-Bihar, Sunil Kumar said.

Kumar said applications for the same will soon be filed by the producers with the GI Registry for these products.

Earlier three applications from Bihar have been recently filed with the Geographical Indications Registry (Chennai), seeking a GI tag for Hajipur’s famous ‘chiniya’ variety of banana, Nalanda’s popular ‘Bawan Buti’ sari tradition and Gaya’s ‘Pattharkatti Stone Craft’ with the support of NABARD.

“The applications seeking GI tag for Hajipur banana, Nalanda’s Bawan Buti sari tradition and Gaya’s stone craft have already been filed by associations of farmers, weavers and organisations associated with skilled stone craftsmen of the respective areas with the support of NABARD,” Kumar added.

The CGM further added, “NABARD-Bihar has identified six potential products of the region, including Khurma, Tilkut and Balu Shahi, to be registered under GI. Bihar is a state of taste, where one can find delicious food items. NABARD is playing an important role in the GI registration process and post GI initiative including marketing linkages, branding, promotion and recognised first organisation in the country, who has specific GI Policy and schemes.”

“Bhojpur’s Khurma is very much liked by foreigners. It is so juicy along with the sweetness from inside that the taste reaches the heart directly from the tongue. The same is the case with the famous Tilkut of Gaya. Tilkut is a unique treat made from sesame seeds and jaggery and is quite popular outside the country also. Balu shahi a delicate sweet of village Runni Saidpur in Sitamarhi is also very popular in the country. These products of Bihar must get GI tag,” said the CGM.

Recently, the Geographical Indications Registry (GIR) accepted the plea to rename Bihar Makhana as Mithila Makhana and also suggested further amendments in the brand logo to better reflect its origins apart from identifying and protecting the product’s GI rights. Other products of Bihar that have already got GI tag, include Katarni Rice, Jardalu Mango, Shahi Litchi, Magahi Paan and Silao Khaja.

Kumar said applications for the same will